like a pair of bottle rockets

My name is Sophie. I'm a writer.

sophcw at gmail dot com

twitter

#writing

~*link roundup*~

I guess I’m gonna start being one of those assholes who posts a list of shit they wrote every week. I promise I will only post stuff I’m genuinely really psyched about, and I’m gonna include some other people’s stuff too because all I do is read on the internet and I love you all. 

~~by me, for ANIMAL~~

Facebook Experiment Manipulates Emotions Of 600,000 Users - this is some crazy shit

'Cuphead' Video Game Looks Like A 1930's Cartoon <—- so sick

Artist Accepting Reservations For “Dream Cage” In Bushwick - sadly already taken off Airbnb

Experience Being A Rock In “Rock Simulator 2014” - why do I think this is so funny

~~by me, for other places~~

How To Dress Well, “What Is This Heart?” Review - Rolling Stone

~~other people~~

Scary New Congressional Bill Would Force Medication on Some Mentally Ill People by David Grossman for Alternet

Home Is Where the Hatred Is by Ta-Nehisi Coates for The Atlantic

HOW SORCERY SAVED LIVES DURING THE RWANDAN GENOCIDE by Sally Hayden for VICE

Koons, The Koons, and Me: An Encounter with the Art Star Jeff Koons by Hari Nef for BlackBook

 

“My hope is to give people who are interested some entrée into further reading, and also to credit the antecedents to my own thinking. Perhaps most importantly, I wish to return to one of the original features of blogging—the documentation of public thinking. I would suggest that more writers, more academics, and more journalists do this, and do so honestly. It have come to believe that arguing with the self is as important as arguing with the broader world.”

– This is really cool - Ta-Nehisi Coates is doing a “narrative bibliography" of his reparations piece in four parts. Really fascinating and I think the above is a fantastic recommendation. 

I’m sitting in my backyard on a beautiful day. Earlier I had brunch with my father who happens to be visiting from California and his college friends. Afterwards, my boyfriend and I walked through Central Park. We lay on the grass and I thought about us and all the people in the city and in the world and how small we all were, how small my little life is in comparison to the vastness of space, time, the universe. Then I got a text from my mom telling me my grandma had two more mini-strokes and might never remember who I am again. 

Now I’m sitting here with this stray cat as my neighbor plays pop punk and Katy Perry out her window. I should be working on an essay, and I just found out I’m writing another piece for a big deal publication. 

The neighbor started playing The Dodos. I remember when I drove down to San Francisco to see them at Amoeba. The cat is stalking something in the grass.

How strange it is, etc. 

So may the sunrise bring hope where it once was forgotten.”

If I try, I can envision a series of innumerable mornings, stretching towards my future and into the past, all the same. Sitting alone in a quiet room as the light of dawn creeps in, drinking tea, listening to this song. All these mornings, the same. Awake at the wrong time, as if my bed was a time machine. This is what I do after all else has failed. Insomnia may be the only truly solitary experience I have left.  

noiseymusic:

tUnE-yArDs Has Become Too Quirky for Her Own Good
From the second the out-of-place organ hits in the first few seconds of Nikki Nack’s opener “Find A New Way,” I knew something was wrong with the new tUnE-yArDs album. As I listened through, there were a few moments of pure brilliance, but more often, there were words and arrangements that made me cringe. As much as I hate to admit it, it’s inescapable: tUnE-yArds has become what her critics always accused her of. She’s become too quirky for her own good. 
Critics like Chuck Klosterman (i.e. white, 30-something, “serious” straight dudes), who wrote a condescending, sexist essay about her in 2012, have always been assholes about tUnE-yArDs and her quirky streak. Despite their disapproval and anger over her alternating capitalization, Merril Garbus, who is tUnE-yArDs, has always been smart enough to understand the potential turn offs of her art, and to not care. Her music is about disarming those who are afraid of unmasked emotion and vulnerability. Her music, and its subjects, is also distinctly feminine, and many of the people who have written negatively about her lack of seriousness or overuse of emotion have denigrated her in a gendered fashion. But she has succeeded despite them, garnering mostly rave reviews and wowing increasingly larger audiences around the world. Garbus, with her willingness to not take herself too seriously while displaying her serious talent both live and recorded, was the perfect foil for the indie rock establishment. 
For these reasons, I’ve always stood up for tUnE-yArds in the face of people who tried to make her into a joke. That is, until now.
Continue

I wrote this. 

noiseymusic:

tUnE-yArDs Has Become Too Quirky for Her Own Good

From the second the out-of-place organ hits in the first few seconds of Nikki Nack’s opener “Find A New Way,” I knew something was wrong with the new tUnE-yArDs album. As I listened through, there were a few moments of pure brilliance, but more often, there were words and arrangements that made me cringe. As much as I hate to admit it, it’s inescapable: tUnE-yArds has become what her critics always accused her of. She’s become too quirky for her own good. 

Critics like Chuck Klosterman (i.e. white, 30-something, “serious” straight dudes), who wrote a condescending, sexist essay about her in 2012, have always been assholes about tUnE-yArDs and her quirky streak. Despite their disapproval and anger over her alternating capitalization, Merril Garbus, who is tUnE-yArDs, has always been smart enough to understand the potential turn offs of her art, and to not care. Her music is about disarming those who are afraid of unmasked emotion and vulnerability. Her music, and its subjects, is also distinctly feminine, and many of the people who have written negatively about her lack of seriousness or overuse of emotion have denigrated her in a gendered fashion. But she has succeeded despite them, garnering mostly rave reviews and wowing increasingly larger audiences around the world. Garbus, with her willingness to not take herself too seriously while displaying her serious talent both live and recorded, was the perfect foil for the indie rock establishment. 

For these reasons, I’ve always stood up for tUnE-yArds in the face of people who tried to make her into a joke. That is, until now.

Continue

I wrote this.